HR Analytics – Use it. Own it.

 

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It is time for Human Resources to own the numbers.  After all, the words ‘Human’ and ‘Resources’ are used together for a reason.  Human Resources is not just about leading the humans.  It is also about the powerful management and leadership of resources associated with what the humans bring to the success of the organization.

Our role, as effective Human Resource leaders, is to ensure that we are constant in bringing forth both the human and the resource elements to the strategic management table.  One of the most powerful resource tools at our fingertips is Workforce Analytics.  Using the analytics tool effectively is key to ensuring both functional Human Resources and operational strategic success.

When we fail to bring both parts of the human and resources equation forward, we fail at our jobs as Human Resources leaders.  Failure is pretty easy as noted by Mark Barry, a successful Human Resources leader in the United States.  Mr. Barry offers us a step-by-step approach to how HR Analytics should be used as the resource tool, from the perspective of learning from one’s mistakes.

Click Here to Read the Article

What we learn from our mistakes, is how to change the outcome from failure to one of success by using HR Analytics effectively.  Of the seven Human Resources lessons learned from this article, there are two in particular that bear closer scrutiny.

First, where does HR Analytics report?  If the function of Human Resources is not responsible for the ownership of resources through understanding the people numbers, implementing the metrics, evaluating the measures, and leading everything that is data driven and comes from the organizational workforce for purposes of decision making, then the Human Resources function is not accountable for any of it.  If the Human Resources function is not responsible nor accountable for analytical resources, then that resource part of the Human Resources equation is lost.

When the power of analytical resources goes to others in the organization, Human Resources will have given up the fundamental strength that comes with workforce planning and development, which must be vested within the Human Resources function.

This leads to the second lesson, Human Resources needs to position itself strategically.  Again, if the Human Resources function is able to leverage the knowledge that comes from owning the resource of analytics, we can influence decision-making based on the powerful combination of putting the humans together with the resources to drive organizational success.

Discussion Questions:

  1. If analytics are not vested in the Human Resource function, where would they reside in an organizational structure? What impact will this have on Human Resources?
  2. What are the benefits of having organizational analytics available through the Human Resources function?
  3. Identify three Human Resources activities that can be measured and link directly to effective organizational performance.
  4. Identify three strategic decisions that HR can influence by bringing forward both a human (workforce) and resource (analytical) based plan or proposal to the corporate table.

Getting a Pulse on Employee Engagement

From the HR Practitioner’s perspective, it is very important to be able to assess and measure a range of employee activities.  The most common method of employee related data collection is through an annual employee engagement survey.

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Many of us spend a lot of time sending out the surveys; waiting for employee responses; sending out prompts to remind employees to respond; collecting the data; analyzing the data; writing reports about what we think the data means; and then, finally, coming up with recommendations that we hope will address the issues.  The process and the methodology for all of this is usually electronic and should be efficient; however, the reality and timing is not always on the mark.  When all of the data collection and report writing is complete, it is usually time for another annual survey and the process starts all over again.

Maybe it is time to pitch the long and drawn out annual employee engagement survey. If your organization is not doing annual employee surveys at all or if the annual surveys are stopped, how else can the HR practitioner assess and evaluate what employees are thinking about their workplace?

 

The Director of Customer Happiness at OfficeVibe was interviewed recently on the CBC radio network. He offers a short and sweet approach to employee engagement activities.

Click Here to Listen to the Interview.

It seems that sending out annual surveys could be a thing of the past if the future relies on constant and meaningful employee engagement strategies.

Discussion Questions:

  1. What are metrics?
  2. What are the specific metrics that provide good indicators for employee engagement?
  3. What are privacy concerns related to the collection of data from employees?
  4. Do you agree that a weekly ‘pulse’ survey would be an effective way to gauge employee engagement?
  5. Would you recommend a product like ‘OfficeVibe’ to your employer? Why or why not?
  6. What are some of the risks involved in employee engagement surveys?