Education, Skills and Experience – Willing to Relocate?

Maybe Not!

Source: Slavoljub Pantelic/Shutterstock
Source: Slavoljub Pantelic/Shutterstock

It seems to be a ridiculous notion, that, by having to move from one location to another, one might become less valuable in the economic marketplace.  This concept becomes even more ridiculous when considering the level of highly competent individuals who have worked diligently to earn formal professional credentials and carry with them years of professional training, expertise, and experience.  Yet, when these highly competent and trained individuals move from their home location to a new part of Canada, this is exactly what happens.

A recent report, Brain Gain 2015: The State of Canada’s Learning Recognition System issued by the Conference Board of Canada focuses on this issue.

Click Here to Read the Full Report

Click Here to Read a Summary Article

As noted in this article, Canadian workers stand to gain billions of dollars in economic gains should provinces recognize formal accreditation, training, and standards acquired from different places around the world.  When Canadian workers gain economically, there is a direct connection to the Canadian economy gaining as a whole.  However, this seems to be an untapped area of possibilities and opportunities.

This lack of recognition of credentials and learned expertise is not a new concept.  We see, hear, and read numerous accounts about the loss of employment credentials particularly focused on internationally trained immigrants coming to Canada.  There are numerous stories of dedicated and trained professionals landing in Canada who end up taking employment opportunities well below their career capacities.

What is not often highlighted, however, is the notion of province to province employment migration resulting in a similarly significant potential loss of credential recognition.

As Human Resources professionals, we too must face this challenge.  For those of us practicing in Ontario, we are able to earn credentials through the Human Resources Professionals Association resulting in one of three Canadian designations; CHRP, CHRL or CHRE.  Other provinces have their own credentialing bodies or professional association requirements.

It would certainly be a shame to lose the credibility of these earned credentials if one moved from Ontario to another province or vice versa.  Should fully trained, competent Human Resources professionals with years of experience, knowledge, expertise, and credentials expect to lose economically when transferring from one province to another?

There does not seem to be any benefit from this potential loss to anyone. The gains, on the other hand, from recognizing what has been legitimately earned seem to be significant.

Discussion Questions:

  1. Would you move to another location/country for work purposes if you knew your earned credentials or learned experience would not be recognized?
  2. How would provincial economies benefit from recognizing external credentials?
  3. Why do you think out of province and/or out of country credentials are not recognized?
  4. What is the value of learned experience from your perspective?
  5. Would you rather get advice from an HR professional who has ‘education’ credentials and ‘minimal’ experience or from an HR Professional who has years of experience and ‘minimal’ credentials?

Links to Learning

No matter what course you are taking, if you are using this textbook, you are learning about learning.

Hopefully, somewhere along the path of your studies, there have been some ‘ah-ha’ moments and perhaps some questions that have heightened your curiosity about adult learning styles and your own learning process.

Source: leungchopan/Shutterstock
Source: leungchopan/Shutterstock

Due to the benefits of digital technology, our collective ability to access learning as part of the Human Resources community has never been greater.  The shift to digital resources has forced us to move from being narrow and focused only on training,  into active and continuously engaged in providing life-long learning opportunities, no matter what organization you may serve.

With so many online resources,  it can be difficult to navigate what may, or may not, be useful. An excellent Canadian resource for on-going learning is The Institute for Performance and Learning, formerly known as the Canadian Society for Training and Development.  Through the institute’s website you will find good resources for work-performance related tools and an opportunity to become part of the larger community of certified learning and training professionals.

Discussion Questions:

  1. How has your own learning style changed over the course of your academic studies?
  2. Why has the Institute for Performance and Learning moved through a re-branding process?
  3. What benefit does additional certification, in the area of Training and Development, provide for you as a Human Resources Professional?

Let’s Celebrate Labour Day, eh?

A History Worth Understanding.

Every day that they put this legislation off to the future is more time to negotiate.”   –    Sid Ryan.

 As Canadians, we enjoy a remarkable history related to the development of unions and the labour movement.   This historic past is built on the need for social change that provides a future benefit to all of us as workers in Canada.   Most of Canadian labour history provides evidence of our more peaceful natures as powerful union leaders; such as, Sid Ryan’s use effective negotiation skills to achieve legislative changes.  There are however, critical moments in our collective history based on violence and turbulent times.  All of this history continues to be celebrated annually on Labour Day, which is a statutory Canadian federal holiday.

The importance of Labour Day and its connection to the history of the labour movement is highlighted in the following article:

Click here to read the article

Since this article was first published, in 2009, there have been numerous legislative changes that have continued to improve the lives of Canadian workers as a result of the drive and dedication of the labour movement in Canada.  The future of the labour movement in Canada is built on numerous significant events from the past.

Unions have drastically altered our society and our economy. We have all benefited from the labour movement for such things as workplace safety, greater vacation, and maternity and parental leave benefits.  When we remember the past and think about the future, do we want to live in an economy or do we want to live in a society with an economy? Unions support the latter and continue to change history as a result.

Clearly, history does not stop.   It provides us with pictures of moments in time that we may not recognize as important when they are happening. Labour Day provides us with an opportunity to celebrate our collective labour history, reflect on those important moments in time, and to honour our past as we look to the future.

Discussion Questions:

  1. This article is dated from 2009. Identify new workplace legislation that has been implemented since that time either federally or in the province where you live. What is the link between each piece of new legislation and the labour movement?
  2. What types of workplace benefits do you enjoy as a result of the labour movement in Canada?
  3. Which historic labour-related event do you think has had the most impact on the lives of Canadian workers?
  4. How do you celebrate labour day?
  5. Will you participate in the next Labour Day parade in your community? Why or why not?
  6. What would prompt you to participate in a Labour Day parade?